3 - Multiple Choice Questions

 

Lesson 1:
Guided Practice

 

Practice

Read the following passage.  This is the opening paragraph to a short story.  You don’t need to read the rest of the story in order to answer the multiple-choice question that will follow.

He was clinging to a tree, about twenty metres from shore when I first spotted him. He was wearing a shirt and tie. Maybe he was a businessman on his way home from work when somehow he fell into the river. Now he was only a handhold away from drowning.

Here is the question: 

Q:  Why is this paragraph a good introduction?

A.     It begins the story.

B.     It introduces the narrator.

C.     It established the situation.

D.    It explains the weather conditions.

 

Now pull out a piece of paper and follow those four easy steps.

 

Step 1

Read the whole question and highlight the key words.

 

Check your answer and hear an explanation,

 

 

Step 2

Try to answer the question without looking at the choices. This is also a good place to stop and think about the type of question it is.  Is it a Right There or a Think and Search question – in other words, will I find the answer directly in the passage? Or is it an Author and Me question – i.e. will I have to use information in my mind in combination with what is in the passage?

 

Q:  Why is this paragraph a good introduction?

 

 

This is an Author and Me type of question.  The answer is not in the passage.  You have to rely on what you know about introductory paragraphs and short stories.  Once you have an answer in mind, move on to Step 3.

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3

Read all of the choices and eliminate the ones you know are wrong.

 

Q:  Why is this paragraph a good introduction?

A.     It begins the story.

B.     It introduces the narrator.

C.     It established the situation.

D.    It explains the weather conditions.

 

On a piece of paper, write down the answers you now are wrong.  Check your answer and hear an explanation.

 

 

Step 4

Look at the remaining answers and make a choice. 

 

The majority of multiple-choice questions have at least one answer that is almost correct.  When you get down to two choices, think carefully before making your final selection.

Is the answer A or C?

Check your answer and hear an explanation.

 

 

Finished?

 

Go to  Lesson 2: Independent Practice